Springingtiger's Blog


Intuition and Intellect

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Over the last couple of months I have found that there are two ways to approach The Daily Greatness Journal in the morning, intellect and intuition. Sometimes I make the mistake of approaching my day reasonably and logically which may appear sensible, but is not the most useful approach.
I have learned that the most powerful way to start my day is from my intuition. The best days are the days that call me into being, that inspire me to greatness. If I approach my day rationally I have imposed limits on myself before I even start and my day is destined to be small and uninspiring. There is a place for sense and reason in my day, but later when I’m actually making my goals concrete, at the start my need is to be inspired. I like, as I have mentioned previously, to begin my day by creating my Circle of Sovereignty as practised in Darren Eden’s courses. In the space created by the Circle of Sovereignty my intuition is free to generate a day of infinite possibility. Logically I know I may not accomplish all the goals my intuition has given me in the day, but that doesn’t matter half as much as having a life that excites and inspires me.

In the evening when I review my day I find it useful to logically analyse my day and assess my accomplishments. However once I have done that I again enter my Sovereign Circle and reassess the whole day in the light of intuition. I find that intuition frequently causes me to discover triumphs and blessings in unexpected places. Intuition penetrates the mundane veneer of the everyday and reveals the truth of life concealed beneath. Intellect provides the methodology of accomplishment, but it is intuition that reveals the magic in every moment and lifts every day out of the ordinary. Intuition needs intellect to ground it in reality, but intellect needs intuition to free it from the fetters of realism. As I end my day, before I sleep, I create my Circle and go to sleep in my intuition. I end the day in intuition, I begin the new day with intuition, I expect my day to be magical and full of inspiration and I shall plan accordingly.



Old Poems from 2008
April 17, 2014, 22:28
Filed under: Writing | Tags: , ,

Going through an old diary I found some poems I wrote in Brighton in 2008.

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1.
my wife struggles with her chopsticks
but she enjoys her food
her eyes are smiling
nto mine

2.
Sushi, saki
Japanese service
Small wonder I’m smiling!

3.
my sister sits on the moon
and smiles in satisfaction
even above the crashing waves
her voice is heard

4.
Beware this work is powerful!
When the box is opened
It may not always
Be closed again.



Retreating into Love

In early April I went to the Friary of St.Francis at Alnmouth for a few days, three in silence, to seek guidance. I had turned sixty and become unemployed so it seemed like an appropriate moment to spend some time in reflection.

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My retreat has been worthwhile. I had a long interview with Brother Reginald before I began my retreat. I explained that I had turned sixty years old and, being no longer in employment, had time on my hands, gaps in my life, with no idea of with what to full them or the direction in which I wished to go. Various things came up in the conversation I talked about myself and he shared some of his experience. I told him I had not intended to go to Mass that day, but had I not done do I would have missed singing “Dear Lord and Father of Mankind” and I explained it’s significance to me (a blog in itself); I was reasonably convinced I was in the right place. I didn’t know how God would guide me, our even if he would, but if I was going to hear him anywhere I reckoned this was the place.

By the time we finished talking, the library was no longer being used by a visiting “day group” so in I went. The room in which I was staying was named for the Capuchin San Lorenzo Da Brindisi so it occurred to me to start my quest for guidance with his sermons, but it was not to be, I could find none. However during our conversation I had mentioned to Brother Reginald that I had been introduced to the Society of Saint Francis by Fr. Raymond Lloyd before he became the friar Brother Ramon SSF; I went looking for the novel he wrote about Jacopone Da Todi, but I couldn’t find it so I came away with his “Soul Friends – A Journey with Thomas Merton”.

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I had tried to read Merton as a student, but unlike Teresa of Avila, he never really grabbed me. With Br. Ramon to guide me I found the journey quite exciting and one after another the questions playing on my mind, as well as several I had deferred for later consideration, were addressed, answered or laid to rest. In one of my breaks from reading the book in the Sacrament chapel I wrote a poem about silence and sensory processing, it is not good and I doubt ever any amount of editing will greatly improve it, but a couple of stanzas ended with, “All shall be well”. Later as read further, still in the Sacrament chapel, I came upon Merton’s reaction to Julian of Norwich and found myself so bathed and full of love that I could not stop myself from weeping and laughing. I don’t know where I am going out how I am going to get there, but Br. Reginald advised me to let go and trust and now that seems so obvious.

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Later, tears dry, supper eaten, in my rightful mind I looked back on those moments in the chapel and realised that, although the experience now exists only in my memories, the confidence that all shall be well, that all manner of things shall be well, lives on and I expect it will continue to do so.

Over night there came to me a terrible realisation of how unlovable I am. I was confronted with all that is disgusting in my attitudes; smugness, self-satisfaction, vanity, selfishness, not only an inability to forgive, but to rejoice in the misfortunes of others. All in all the vision I had of myself was quite abhorrent, but then I felt Siva, God, speak to my inner self and say that he loves me anyway, regardless of all the unworthiness I might feel. It became clear that I may judge myself, other people may judge me, but God doesn’t judge me he just loves me utterly, absolutely, without reservation. The night before it had felt obvious that I should let go and trust that everything would be well, but now it is inconceivable that I should do anything else. I cannot pretend that I did not know all this, but sometimes, being human, l forget; it is good to be reminded of what love really means. “All shall be well, and all manner of things shall be well”.

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Retreating into Love

In early April I went to the Friary of St.Francis at Alnmouth for a few days, three in silence, to seek guidance. I had turned sixty and become unemployed so it seemed like an appropriate moment to spend some time in reflection.

image

My retreat has been worthwhile. I had a long interview with Brother Reginald before I began my retreat. I explained that I had turned sixty years old and, being no longer in employment, had time on my hands, gaps in my life, with no idea of with what to full them or the direction in which I wished to go. Various things came up in the conversation I talked about myself and he shared some of his experience. I told him I had not intended to go to Mass that day, but had I not done do I would have missed singing “Dear Lord and Father of Mankind” and I explained it’s significance to me (a blog in itself); I was reasonably convinced I was in the right place. I didn’t know how God would guide me, our even if he would, but if I was going to hear him anywhere I reckoned this was the place.

By the time we finished talking, the library was no longer being used by a visiting “day group” so in I went. The room in which I was staying was named for the Capuchin San Lorenzo Da Brindisi so it occurred to me to start my quest for guidance with his sermons, but it was not to be, I could find none. However during our conversation I had mentioned to Brother Reginald that I had been introduced to the Society of Saint Francis by Fr. Raymond Lloyd before he became the friar Brother Ramon SSF; I went looking for the novel he wrote about Jacopone Da Todi, but I couldn’t find it so I came away with his “Soul Friends – A Journey with Thomas Merton”.

image

I had tried to read Merton as a student, but unlike Teresa of Avila, he never really grabbed me. With Br. Ramon to guide me I found the journey quite exciting and one after another the questions playing on my mind, as well as several I had deferred for later consideration, were addressed, answered or laid to rest. In one of my breaks from reading the book in the Sacrament chapel I wrote a poem about silence and sensory processing, it is not good and I doubt ever any amount of editing will greatly improve it, but a couple of stanzas ended with, “All shall be well”. Later as read further, still in the Sacrament chapel, I came upon Merton’s reaction to Julian of Norwich and found myself so bathed and full of love that I could not stop myself from weeping and laughing. I don’t know where I am going out how I am going to get there, but Br. Reginald advised me to let go and trust and now that seems so obvious.

image

Later, tears dry, supper eaten, in my rightful mind I looked back on those moments in the chapel and realised that, although the experience now exists only in my memories, the confidence that all shall be well, that all manner of things shall be well, lives on and I expect it will continue to do so.

Over night there came to me a terrible realisation of how unlovable I am. I was confronted with all that is disgusting in my attitudes; smugness, self-satisfaction, vanity, selfishness, not only an inability to forgive, but to rejoice in the misfortunes of others. All in all the vision I had of myself was quite abhorrent, but then I felt Siva, God, speak to my inner self and say that he loves me anyway, regardless of all the unworthiness I might feel. It became clear that I may judge myself, other people may judge me, but God doesn’t judge me he just loves me utterly, absolutely, without reservation. The night before it had felt obvious that I should let go and trust that everything would be well, but now it is inconceivable that I should do anything else. I cannot pretend that I did not know all this, but sometimes, being human, l forget; it is good to be reminded of what love really means. “All shall be well, and all manner of things shall be well”.

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Secure In Your 0wn Greatness

While I was writing this post illness  intervened and so I wrote about the effect of illness on greatness; however now is the time to revisit this post and see if I can recapture my thoughts. If you add a month on to any times mentioned you may get an idea of the length of this vastly extended month.

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It is well over a month since I attended Darren Eden’s weekend workshop “The Power of Sovereignty”, two since “Your Call To Greatness”, I have been using the “Daily Greatness Journal” for a couple of months nearly and I am convinced that there is no such thing as “greatness”. Greatness is not a thing, it’s an attitude, a state of mind, a way of being. The truly great don’t think they are great, they don’t “know” they are great, greatness is intrinsic to who they are. People think of greatness as a definable thing, but no two definitions of greatness are the same. St Francis of Assisi is great, Muhammad Ali was “The Greatest”, we ascribe greatness to many people, but most of those people had no thought of greatness, apart from Ali of course, they were merely doing that about which they were passionate. Some desired to be the best in their field, particularly in sports, some sought only to get a job done and there are many generals, knowing the cost of completing the job, who would fell uneasy at being called great. There are, of course many, whose greatness is not realised outside certain circles, few are the mathematicians or plant breeders whose names are household words.

I discovered, doing my journal, not that I don’t have any ambitions, but that there are no ambitions upon which my Greatness is pendant. I think ambitions may be divided into three types: those you need to fulfill, which might include finding food and shelter, for some it may include earning money, but I suspect many perceived needs are no such thing; there are ambitions you are compelled to fulfill like meeting performance targets or delivering on promises; best of all are the the ambitions you want to accomplish, the things you do merely because you want to, no need, no compulsion. However I find that while there are many things I would like to do, there are very few, at the moment, that I feel driven to achieve, I am surprisingly content. There are actions I would have to take to maintain my status quo in material terms, but nothing that precludes alternative choices. I am now also unencumbered by employment which leaves me in the enviable position of being able to make it all up, to create goals and choose responsibilities.

The wonderful thing about using the Daily Greatness Journal is that it prevents me from allowing my greatness to escape my awareness unnoticed and unrecognised. The daily and weekly reviews compel me to find accomplishments upon which I can build however small, I am forced to recognise the life lessons I have learned and to constantly appreciate the gifts I receive every day. In the morning a diligent refusal to leave any section unwritten reminds me of how much i have to be grateful for and the benefits that gratitude brings to my lme e. The Daily Greatness Journal also has me set measurable goals and introduce the discipline of a schedule to my days, although that scheduling can be as flexible as I choose and the discipline as light; however it’s presence encourages a certain honesty when reviewing my day.

Greatness is not an end to be achieved, but a way of living. I think that greatness cannot be measured by results nor by fame, status, money nor even by public acclaim; greatness lies in how we live our lives, in how we respond to the challenges with which we are faced. Greatness, like love, is a choice we make, not a feeling we have, not even an inherent quality, but a committed way of being. Greatness arises when we choose not to be bound by our beliefs and the limitations they impose on us, but to live with awareness and appreciation of all the gifts we have been given. I came face to face with a few days ago. I met a friar who joined the order before I was born. He still leads a fairly active life, working, praying, saying Mass, travelling to preach, leading retreats and doing his share of the housework; he is ninety three and he uses every moment to radiate joy.

Using the Journal is transformative, because, as you use it, it becomes obvious that the point of the journaling as with Darren Eden’s work is not about having people recognise you as great, but for you to be able to live secure in your own greatness. It is no accident that Darren’s eight month programme is called “The Transformation “, at the end of the day other people’s opinions of you are only that, other people’s opinions; the opinion that matters is your own a  nd it will be given by your awareness that you are becoming the sort of person you have always admired, and understanding that you are just you, and enjoying who you are. l don’t really do affirmations, but if I did, I think my affirmation for today must be, “I am secure in my own greatness!”



Asperger’s Syndrome And Interviews
April 4, 2014, 21:19
Filed under: Uncategorized

http://wp.me/pB52U-tZ



Puzzling Symbols
April 3, 2014, 21:36
Filed under: Uncategorized | Tags: , , , ,

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Whenever anyone uses the a jigsaw puzzle piece to symbolise autism there are plenty of others who object, it is so inevitable that some see the whole matter as tedious. We all know the objections, that the symbol implies that autistics are, in some way, incomplete, that they have something missing, or that autism is itself a problem that only needs the missing piece to bring about a solution.

The problem is not with the symbol, whatever it is, the issue is one of whose definition it is. The use of the puzzle piece is similar to the use of the word “retard” or a slave owner calling an African, “nigger”. It is imposed upon a minority by a majority who have abrogated to themselves the right to define what is normal and acceptable. There is nothing wrong with people defining what is normal for them, but they have no right to impose that definition on others; the normal of Autism, or rather the normals of Autism, is not the normal of ordinary humans. I can appreciate that the puzzle piece does make sense for many people and I realise that from the outside autism looks confusing; however no more than society does to the autistic. Perhaps autism does need a symbol around which the community can rally, but please bear in mind that for many autistic people, as a symbol the puzzle piece is as welcome as the Robertson Golly is to black people.

The puzzle piece was an honest attempt to symbolise autism and it worked for some people, but now that so many autistic people are actively advocating and campaigning for the autistic community we need a symbol that does not divide us.




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